What's Growin' On at the Farm

Posted 4/17/2013 12:34pm by Minnesota Food Association.

Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program (BFRDP) started in 2008 and has gone through 4 rounds of granting funds to farmers and ranchers, organizations that work for and with beginning farmers and universities and other institutions to promote and build a new generation of farmers and farming in America. This relatively small portion of the budget has assisted hundreds of organizations and thousands of farmers and ranchers. But like 37 other farm bill programs that don’t have a baseline beyond the 2008 Farm Bill, the BFRDP is currently frozen.   Funding was not included in the short-term farm bill extension passed in January or in the Continuing Resolution passed in March to keep the government funded. 

 It appears that the BFRDP will not get funding in time for a 5th round in 2013. Previous awards are respected but we could miss a full year of funding that could help up to 40 programs and operations across the country. It's not for sure, but it would be very challenging for NIFA to develop an RFA, accept applications, complete the review process and award projects before Sept. 30, 2013 – the end of the fiscal year.

 A relatively small proportion of the Farm Bill goes to beginning and small farmers programs that have shown their effectiveness and these should be maintained as a long –term commitment to our future food system. If these programs are eventually cut for our nation's fiscal health, then I hope it has the result we are looking for. Because on the side of the new food and farming movement, a decrease in effectiveness and capacity will be felt and there will be hurt. MFA has received a 3-year grant from the NIFA BFRDP for Oct 2013 – Sept 2015 to conduct training and education for underserved beginning farmers, increase capacity in developing markets and filling some basic infrastructure needs. This project is on-going and going well. We hope for the sake of our future farming and food systems that this nation-wide Program continues. Call or write your Reps and tell them you support beginning farmer programs.

 

Glen

 

Glen Hill

Executive Director

Minnesota Food Association

Email: glenhill@mnfoodassociation.org

 

April 15, 2013

Posted 4/17/2013 12:33pm by Minnesota Food Association.

Yes, we love to talk about the weather and follow the weather intently. We sort of laugh or shrug about it as part of Minnesota, but MN is blessed with being very deep inland, in the more northern middle part of a large land mass, and this is where you can get huge and spectacular and devastating and destructive weather events any season of the year. But for farmers and farming, weather matters significantly. It affects your livelihood not just your comfort. In fact, it is this blessing or curse that can make or break your season and livelihood, and you have no control over it. Would someone enter a business venture with having absolutely no control over a totally significant factor that could make or break it? That's why lawyers and insurance people work to take out the risk. But the weather does not have lawyers. Many of us can do our jobs on a snowy day in mid-April, and many farmers are working in the greenhouse, making plans, setting up markets. The extended forecast looks to be more cool and wet, yet the farmers go forward almost like on an equinox type of clock. How does this affect farmers at Big River Farms and other vegetable growers?

It's timing.

 Ideally you work from what markets you have and what you would like to produce by when in what quantities. Then you determine what and how much and what time frame you are going to plant. Then you count back and plan a day or week when you want to plant in the greenhouse and the day or week you want to direct seed in the fields. Then you hope that the fields are dry enough that the tractor can get in to till your initial plots within one or two days of when you plan to plant. This way you hope to know that, say, in the first week of August you will have 10 cases of green peppers for this market.  But if it is too cold or wet to get in the fields in the time frame you planned for, this can delay the harvest. The soil has to be warm enough as well. It is also not good to hold transplants in small cell trays past a certain growth stage when they should go in the ground; they can stunt. Farmers are clever and they see what is coming. Some say a cold Spring leads to great Summer yields. I imagine that others are making adjustments and plans.

 The next 10 days foreshadow 7 nights below freezing and daytime highs in the mid-40s (after the few inches of snow today). We'll be fine, but we could use a little more sun and warmth for the ground.

 

 Glen

 Glen Hill

Executive Director

Minnesota Food Association

Email: glenhill@mnfoodassociation.org

 

April 11, 2013

Posted 4/17/2013 12:32pm by Minnesota Food Association.

By referral from the MN Commissioner of Agriculture, Governor Mark Dayton has appointed Minnesota Food Association's Executive Director, Glen Hill, to the State of Minnesota Food Safety and Defense Task Force for a 4-year term. This is a great honor and public service opportunity.

 This Commission of 15 – 20 volunteers, including representatives from Universities, Department of Agriculture, the food industry, nonprofits and farmers, provides public input to the Department of Agriculture on food safety related issues and assists with public awareness and outreach activities.

 It is a humble honor to be requested to participate in this Task Force. The experience at the table is huge in scope and depth. MFA can bring a perspective from the small-scale, beginning or family farm in what food safety means to them and how they manage their operations. Through MFA's Big River Farms Training Program, MFA has accumulated quite a bit of knowledge and experience in food safety for beginning farmers on a small organic vegetable farm. We developed our Standard Procedures Manual in 2007 and were officially GAP certified for green peppers we were selling to Chipotle at the time. We continue to provide food safety training and follow food safety and cleanliness protocols. We continue to provide in-field training in post harvest handling as well.  Food safety procedures on our farm aim to become just basic routine in how you handle your produce. After all, it's all our names on that product and we are quite proud of the quality.

 I hope over the next four years, I can contribute to improved food safety and awareness in our MN food economy.

  Glen

 

Glen Hill

Executive Director

Minnesota Food Association

Email: glenhill@mnfoodassociation.org

 

March 29, 2013

Posted 4/17/2013 12:31pm by Minnesota Food Association.

For those of you who remember All in the Family, John Belushi on SNL, The 6 Million Dollar Man, how often did you eat out as a kid?  In our family, we ate out on New Year's Eve, Mother's Day, maybe once or twice when on a 2-week vacation and then maybe 2 or 3 times a year when something special happened for my Mom or Dad. So all-in-all, about 6 – 8 times per year, and all of them were special, very exciting events. We all felt that brief moment of guilt when Dad pulled out his wallet to pay at the end of the meal, but then we got over it quickly. They were always at a sit-down type of restaurant. I can't remember eating at a fast food place. I do remember going to a local sub sandwich shop for absolutely great subs. They had 2 sizes – huge and ½ of huge. Piled with anything you wanted, they were the real deal. I remember my Dad helping me calculate (i.e. realize) that the one sub equaled 1 ½ - 2 hours of my wages working as a janitor at the local college. I brought a packed lunch to school almost every day through High School and had the cafeteria lunch about twice a year. Why all this? I am not sure, but I think it was financially more cost-effective and it was just the way it was done in working families with 4 kids. I remember my Home Economics teacher helping us calculate our average calorie intake over the course of the term. I averaged 3,500 – 5,000 calories/day and weighed 112 pounds at 14 years old. Go figure …

 So what has happened to change this in the past 20-30 years? I don't have the answers, it is probably a very complex mix of factors. I think quality, quantity, convenience and price balance in different proportions. Processed food and food fillers have become much cheaper, in both price and quality.  Good food that you purchase in a store and make at home has increased in price. Restaurants and food services have been able to keep prices down and began to make them seemingly more competitive with the cost of eating at home (when you include time, cost of preparation, electricity, water, etc.).  Large advances in productivity in industrial agriculture, especially in corn and soybeans and massive feedlot operations, together with large government subsidies, keeps the price down enough so that restaurants can offer low-priced, low-quality, but filling and attractive looking, menu items. Another aspect is who has time to cook at home and when? With parents working, or in school, or other activities, or shuttling kids, it becomes a very tight schedule. The value of a family sit-down dinner at home is invaluable and enduring. But fresh vegetables take time to prepare, so you have to plan and prepare. Sometimes this works, other weeks it doesn't.

 I think it is a shift in balance where quality has diminished, quantity has increased, convenience has increased, and price differences are diminishing where restaurants are holding their prices with numerous specials and the prices in the grocery stores are slowly, progressively inching up every year.

 There are local farmers in the area that you live, in the Twin Cities Metro or anywhere, that have produce and likely other farm products for sale. You'd be surprised, look them up.  When we look to increasing the quality (including freshness, local economy, production, etc), lowering the quantity (either per meal or seasonal expectations), adjusting the convenience (maybe to try to work it into our weekly routine), and accepting a respectable price, we can influence the local food and farming system and community. You, me, our families and friends, all as consumers can send a message. Eating better is a family and public health issue.

 So …  from a local farmer, buy a ¼ or ½ hog, or get free-range eggs, or sign up for a CSA share. Visit your farmers market, stop at road side stands and buy produce, spend a morning at a pick-your-own place … bring it all up on vacation (or save it at home).

 

Think Spring!

 

Glen

  

Glen Hill

Executive Director

Minnesota Food Association

Email: glenhill@mnfoodassociation.org

 

April 3, 2013

Posted 4/17/2013 12:30pm by Minnesota Food Association.

The wealth and security of a nation and people depends on its food supply and security and what we feed our children. Where does the future food supply and security lie? If you believe that it is in a vast array of local and regional sustainable farms and farmers, then Minnesota Food Association and its Big River Farms stands with you. Over the past 15 – 20 years, the USDA has developed a variety of excellent programs that support new and beginning farmers in different ways. Risk Management Agency's Community Outreach and Assistance Program. Ag Marketing Service's Farmers Market Promotion Program. National Institute for Food and Agriculture's Outreach and Assistance to Socially Disadvantaged Farmers and Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program.  The State Ag Departments' Specialty Crop Block Grant Program and so on. These programs support hundreds of organizations and institutions and thousands of farmers and consumers. They have struggled to establish themselves and have proved the impact through years of solid partnerships. They have had to fight hard to get the minimal budget allocation that they get. With relatively small budgets within the overall Farm Bill, the impact reaches thousands or people and towns and cities. Call your Senator or House Rep and let them know you want to maintain and grow the programs that are building our future farmers because it is essential to our food and national security.

  Glen

 

Glen Hill

Executive Director

Minnesota Food Association

Email: glenhill@mnfoodassociation.org

 

March 29, 2013

Posted 4/17/2013 12:28pm by Minnesota Food Association.

The other day I got a call from the ag marketing service of the USDA. Many provisions in the new Farm Bill that support new and beginning farmers in education, training and marketing are  under consideration for cuts or elimination. These excellent programs with relatively very small budget allocations support hundreds of organizations and institutions and thousands of farmers and the future food producers of our nation. These USDA departments and programs are making every effort to develop reports that show Congress what value they are for their money. Recently, one program that had supported Minnesota Food Association from 2009-2011 in assisting new farmers in developing new markets and marketing approaches selected MFA as a case study in this research.  That is an honor we sincerely appreciate.

 The challenge is finding the balance between quantifiable and qualitative methods and impacts. What was the average increased income per farmer during the period of this grant as a result of the funding from this grant provided? Very good question. And very difficult to get an accurate answer. To increase income from farming, for a beginning farmer, from year #1 to #2 to #3, is definitely possible, but is the result of numerous interacting factors. The previous year's experience is freshest in the mind. Dreaming, entrepreneurial ideas are definitely worth experimenting with.  Cover Cropping, spreading compost on the fields, field and crop rotations and a new extensive irrigation system all add to the annual increase in soil health and productivity. You get increasingly interested in marketing because of the increasing confidence in your farming and your product. You like it so much, you want to make it financially viable.  Our experience shows that with MFA assistance in purchasing and in connecting directly to their own markets, beginning farmers progressively increased their sales each year while in our program.  Sustaining this in transition to your own place is a challenge.

 We wrapped up our phone conversation. I tried to put some numbers on sales and yields, etc.

 So Friday afternoon after that, it's time to get out of the office and see. I saw May Lee arrive and go to the greenhouse. She is a graduate of BRF Training Program and is conducting training classes and mentoring individual farmers in greenhouse propagation and management as part of a pilot initiative in Mentoring Farmers.  Kano, originally from Ethiopia, arrived a little later and went to the greenhouse with his arms full. This is Kano's first year, first time planting in a greenhouse, first one-on-one lesson. So I went to see. May Lee operates her own greenhouse, all certified organic, and knows her farming. Kano is an interpreter for Hennepin and Ramsey Counties, specifically in health. May Lee's daughter Mhonpaj is a health interpreter for Ramsey County. And bingo, they are preparing trays, planting seeds, and talking about which places that need interpretation that they both know and so on.  And it just flowed from there for the next 2 hours. He got all his trays planted for that day, and he has been back two more times since to finish up the rest of his trays. May Lee continues her mentoring work with Kano when needed and with all the other farmers as well.

 What is the value of that? In my opinion, priceless ….

 This is what you support. New farmers and new leaders, with new skills and dreams, and building incredible new relationships for our future. Thank you all for your support.

  

Glen

 

Glen Hill

Executive Director

Minnesota Food Association

Email: glenhill@mnfoodassociation.org

 

March 26, 2013

Posted 1/7/2013 10:34am by Minnesota Food Association.
Dear %%user-name%%,



  Happy New Year!


We’re officially into the 2013 season now, even if it is only January. We had such a great time growing delicious organic veggies for you in 2012 that we jump at the chance to do it again! Our website is all updated with our 2013 share information and we want to invite all of our 2012 members to sign up to support MFA's mission by purchasing a 2013 CSA share.  Outlined below you will find information you’ll need to become a returning CSA member. You’ll also notice that we’re making some changes around here that may affect your membership experience in 2013. 

Please take a moment to check out our new Every-other-week share option.
  
We wanted to offer our members a chance to have the same great tasting veggies in a smaller quantity.  This would be the same size box as our Summer's Best Veggie Share but would be delivered every other week to give you more time to eat all those yummy veggies!

We did have a price increase this year of $15.  However, if you join before January 20th you can take advantage of our returning member discount! 
When you are filling out your sign up there will be a place to use a coupn code.  Just type in renewalcsa2012 to recieve the discount.
 
Please feel free to email or call me at (651) 433-3676 ext.13 with any questions or concerns you might have.  We thank you for your support in 2012, and hope to share our bounty again with you in 2013!

If you are all set to sign up then just Click here to begin your renewal process. Or just copy and paste the link below into your browser:
%%renewal-link%%

Thanks,

 Aaron Blyth and The Big River Farmers 



2013 Share Information

On the next page, you will find a summary of Big River Farms’ 2013 share options. If you haven’t already had the chance, please review a full description of our share options & pricing for 2013 on our website.  When you’re ready to become a member, just follow the link to our fast & secure Online Sign-up forms.

 

  • Gardener’s Special – A mixed flat of herbs, flowers & specialty vegetables for your home garden, ready for planting in mid May.
  • Summer’s Best – 18 weeks of fresh-picked produce available for farm pickup or at one of our 7 neighborhood dropsites throughout the metro area.
  • Every-other-week Share- Want some of Big River Farms great veggies but a full box every week is too much of a good thing?  An every-other-week share may be the perfect fit for you! This is a great way to recieve the fresh goodness of our veggies and support our farmers with a little less commitment to a fullshare.
  • Fall Harvest – We’re excited to offer three boxes of prime fall goodies.  These hefty boxes will be available every other week from mid Oct through Thanksgiving week.
  • Fruitshare – Back again in 2013! You’ll receive a box every other week throughout the season.  While not all of the fruit is local, it is all certified Organic and comes from small orchards we all feel great about supporting!  We have two Fruitshare options scheduled closely with our vegetable shares.
Posted 10/23/2012 3:51pm by Minnesota Food Association.

 

What’s in your box?
 
yellow onion
broccoli (Intrinsik Farm)
kale
carrots (Intrinsik Farm)
butternut squash (Sebra Farm)
delicata (Golden Karen Farm)
purple potatoes
beets

salad mix
arugula
cabbage

Coming up:

black beans
lettuce
spinach
brussel sprouts 

Get creative with your CSA box…try out our recipes!



Things to remember

1. When you arrive to pick up your box, remember to check your name off of the appropriate roster. There will be one each for Summer's Best & Fruitshare members. If you are picking up both, you will need to check your name off of both lists.

2. Please bring a bag or other container to transfer your veggies into & follow the instructions for breaking down your box found in the CSA bin.  The waxed cardboard boxes will need to stay at your site so that we may pick them up the following week for reuse.

3. In the spirit of community, please do not open or go through other boxes. Boxes are packed identically each week and there is no need to look for a better one.  If you are concerned with the contents of your box, or something is missing, please let me know as soon as you can & I'll do my darndest to remedy the situation.

4. Planning a vacation this summer? You've got some options. Invite a friend or neighbor to pick up in your stead while you're away. OR, you can contactme at least 24 hours in advance to donate your box to Minneapolis Market (a foodshelf with dignity).  All donations are tax deductible.  We are unable to prorate or credit you for canceled or forgotten boxes.

 

Upcoming Events

October 13th -
Fall Harvest Party!

 

Important!
The salad mix in the box got packed a little too wet.  Please remove the salad from your bags and either spin it well or place it on a towel on the counter to dry. 

Notes from the Field  

Hey Folks,

The first fall box is upon us!

It was such a pleasure to wake up yesterday and harvest again for the first time in a week.  What doubled the pleasure for me was working in our hoophouse.  Right now our hoophouse is full with salad mix, arugula, two different types of lettuce, and spinach.  It is by far the best looking winter hoophouse I have ever been a part of. 

Yesterday we spent the morning harvesting our salad mix.  This stuff is beautiful!  I hope it comes into your homes in one piece.  It is very small and very delicate.  When you get it home you should take it out of the plastic bag immediatly and spin it or let it dry on a towel.  It was a bit wetter than I like to bag it but we had to bag it to get it to you on time today.

All in all the farm is winding down to a slow steady pace of getting all the little things buttoned up.  I will be putting the last of the covercrops in the ground tomorrow.

I hope you enjoy all the veggies.  I love this mixture of fall crops.
 

Thanks,

Aaron







 


 

 

 

©2012 Minnesota Food Association, 14220 B Ostlund Trail North, Marine on St. Croix, MN 55047 

651-433-3676 ph.  651 433-5050 fax
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Posted 10/10/2012 9:06am by Minnesota Food Association.
Hi folks,

I just wanted to let you all know that the fall veggie shares are about two weeks away and they are looking good!  Most of you are members from our summer share but I believe there are a few new folks as well.  If you are new Welcome to the Farm!  We have all of our potaoes, carrots, beets, parsnips, and onions in the cooler.  The greenhouse has our black beans and wintersquash safely squirreled away. The hoophouse is full of a bed of salad mix, 2 beds of lettuce, some arugula, and lots of spinach.  Still left in the field is a fair amount of broccoli, brussel sprouts, kale, and some herbs.  The hoophouse and field crops all look great.  Now it just needs to stay cold enough to keep them happy but not so cold that they freeze to death.  These late boxes are by far some of my favorite eating adventures of the year. 

DELIVERIES WILL START:

1st delivery - Tuesday October 23rd

2nd delivery - Tuesday November 6th

3rd delivery - Tuesday November 20th (The week of Thanksgiving)


We have it set up that pick-ups will be available at The Butter Bakery Cafe in south Minneapolis and out here at the Farm in Marine on St. Croix (See site descriptions below).  I assume that everyone who signed up for the fall share already understands this.  If you have any questions or concerns about this please let me know.  Also, If you have not picked up at the farm or at Butter Bakery during the season please let me know which site you would prefer to pick up at.   

I will give you another heads up a few days before deliveries start.  Until then please feel free to contact me with any questions you have. 

Thanks,


Aaron

Big River Farms Pick-up

Day

Location

Time

Address

Contact Person

Contact Info

Tuesday

Big River Farms

12:00pm-dusk

14220-B Ostlund Trail N                                Marine on St. Croix, MN 55047

Aaron Blyth

work: 651.433.3676           email: brfcsa@mnfoodassociation.org

 

Directions to Drop-site

Coming from MN-36 heading East towards Stillwater-

Turn LEFT, heading NORTH on Manning Ave/Cty Rd 15

Turn RIGHT onto Square Lake Trail/Cty Rd 7

Turn LEFT on Oldfield Road  

Turn RIGHT at the T in the road

Take a LEFT into Wilder Forest and follow the signs to the Minnesota Food Association

You will see a cluster of buildings with red roofs. Continue on the gravel road past the building with many windows until you reach a small building with a tent overhang named “Harvest Shelter.” The boxes will be inside the shelter in the cooler.

 

 

Butter Bakery

Day

Location

Time

Address

Contact Person

Contact Info

Tuesday

Butter Bakery

1:30pm-9:00pm

3700 Nicolette Ave S Minneapolis, MN 55409

Daniel Swenson Klatt

home: 612.823.0097         

work: 612.521.7401

email:

info@butterbakerycafe.com

 

Directions to Drop-site

Here is a map to the Cafe hereI have to find out where the boxes will be stored while at the Cafe because they have just moved to this new site this week.  I will let you know when I know.



Big River Farms Contact Info

Big River Farms

14220-B Ostlund Trail N

Marine on St. Croix, MN 55047

651.433.3676 ext. 13

Website: www.MnFoodAssociation.org

Email: brfcsa@mnfoodassociation.org

 

Aaron Blyth is the Farm Manager and will be handling questions about logistics of the CSA, vegetables and any financial questions that may arise.

Problem with the box?

Contact Aaron Blyth at brfcsa@mnfoodassociation.org or call 651.433.3676 ext. 13.

We appreciate your support and trust in us, and want to honor that trust with quick responses to any worries or unhappiness. We will do all we can to help rectify the situation and we will work with you to ensure that your relationship with us is a good one.

 

 

 
Posted 10/9/2012 2:09pm by Minnesota Food Association.

 

What’s in your box?
 
yellow onion
brussel sprouts
broccoli (Intrinsik Farm)
parsnips
kale
carrots (Intrinsik Farm)
acorn squash (Sebra Farm)
delicata (Golden Karen Farm)
turnips (Intrinsik Farm)
black beans (Sebra Farm)


Coming up:

first snow
bare trees
long nights of reading
smoke out of chimneys
hot soup
skiing
sunny and -10 degrees
love...
 

Get creative with your CSA box…try out our recipes!

Baleadas!

Maple Glazed Parsnips

Acorn Squash with Kale


Things to remember

1. When you arrive to pick up your box, remember to check your name off of the appropriate roster. There will be one each for Summer's Best & Fruitshare members. If you are picking up both, you will need to check your name off of both lists.

2. Please bring a bag or other container to transfer your veggies into & follow the instructions for breaking down your box found in the CSA bin.  The waxed cardboard boxes will need to stay at your site so that we may pick them up the following week for reuse.

3. In the spirit of community, please do not open or go through other boxes. Boxes are packed identically each week and there is no need to look for a better one.  If you are concerned with the contents of your box, or something is missing, please let me know as soon as you can & I'll do my darndest to remedy the situation.

4. Planning a vacation this summer? You've got some options. Invite a friend or neighbor to pick up in your stead while you're away. OR, you can contactme at least 24 hours in advance to donate your box to Minneapolis Market (a foodshelf with dignity).  All donations are tax deductible.  We are unable to prorate or credit you for canceled or forgotten boxes.

 

Upcoming Events

October 13th -
Fall Harvest Party!

 

Notes from the Field  

Hey Folks,

The last week is upon us and we are finally getting a little rain!  It feels oddly strange to see water that falls naturally from the sky.  And true to the Minnesotans that most of us all, it only took someone out here about two hours of drizzle before complaining about the rain.  I guess two months of drought were not enough days of sunshine.

Well, we all want to thank you for working with us for another season here at the farm.  This year was an interesting mix of huge successes and a few failures (no strawberries and sad garlic).  All in all, I am very happy with how the year went and most of the farmers have said they too felt the year went well.  We could not provide the kind of education and oppurtunity to our farmers that we do with out conscious eaters like you helping us out. THANK YOU!
 
Please note that I put a survey envelope in your boxes this week.  This is a CSA survey by a researcher at St. Thomas.  She is looking at quite a few CSAs in Minnesota and I am very interested in her reults.  Please, if you can take the extra effort to send back her survey that would be wonderful!

Please come on out to our Harvest Party this weekend!  It promises to be a great day of farm goodness.  It is always a pleasure to see some of you again and meet some of you for the first time.  The fall party is a great time to see the farm and meet all of our farmers.  Also, we will have a lot of pumpkins available for taking home for a halloween treat!



Thanks,

Aaron




THIS N' THAT

This is a great box for the all encompassing roasted winter vegetable!  You can throw the parsnips, turnips, both types of squash, the carrots, and even the brussel sprouts into this mix.  Every time we need a quick delicious and easy dinner in the fall or winter, this recipe always comes to mind.

The Baleada recipe is from our wonderful production coordinator Carly who says, "While living in Honduras, I was introduced to arguably the most delicious savory breakfast food ever. Although, I must admit to enjoying just as many late-night baleadas! Hondurans regularly eat this delicious tortilla-egg-bean combination and add seasonably available extras like avocado. I thought that with Porfirio’s black beans in the box this week, this would be a good time to share this delicious dish. "

I love this Acorn Squash and Kale soup!  The bacon adds a wonderful flavor as well.  If you are looking for a good way to use that kale this is for you!

Lastly, I hope you enjoy the parsnips once again this week.  I almost always just eat parsnips in some sort of root bake, however, this Maple glaze recipe is fantastic!

Happy Eating!




 


 

 

 

©2012 Minnesota Food Association, 14220 B Ostlund Trail North, Marine on St. Croix, MN 55047 

651-433-3676 ph.  651 433-5050 fax
Unsubscribe from this email list.
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