What's Growin' On at the Farm

Posted 10/4/2012 10:29am by Minnesota Food Association.

 

What’s in your box?
 
green tomatoes
red onion
brussel sprouts
broccoli
parsnips
kale
carrots (Chickenhead Farm)
butternut squash
dill (Intrinsik Farm)


Next week get ready for:


broccoli
wintersquash
brussel sprouts
carrots


and more... 

Get creative with your CSA box…try out our recipes!

Golden-crusted Brussel Sprouts

Fried Green Tomatoes

Butternut Squash Soup with dill




Things to remember

1. When you arrive to pick up your box, remember to check your name off of the appropriate roster. There will be one each for Summer's Best & Fruitshare members. If you are picking up both, you will need to check your name off of both lists.

2. Please bring a bag or other container to transfer your veggies into & follow the instructions for breaking down your box found in the CSA bin.  The waxed cardboard boxes will need to stay at your site so that we may pick them up the following week for reuse.

3. In the spirit of community, please do not open or go through other boxes. Boxes are packed identically each week and there is no need to look for a better one.  If you are concerned with the contents of your box, or something is missing, please let me know as soon as you can & I'll do my darndest to remedy the situation.

4. Planning a vacation this summer? You've got some options. Invite a friend or neighbor to pick up in your stead while you're away. OR, you can contactme at least 24 hours in advance to donate your box to Minneapolis Market (a foodshelf with dignity).  All donations are tax deductible.  We are unable to prorate or credit you for canceled or forgotten boxes.

 

Upcoming Events

October 13th -
Fall Harvest Party!

 

Notes from the Field  

Hey Folks,

We are down to our second to last box this week.  The season is coming to an end around here.  Many of the farmers in the program are completely done in their fields and only a few of the second and third year folks are coming out still. Each night the sun goes down sooner and each morning the ground is a little bit colder. 

We will be a having our annual Fall Harvest Party next Saturday, October 13th.  Check out more info here.  It is always a great time and we would love to see you all come out for a little while.  I will be roasting a pig the night before and there will be delicious food, music, wagon rides, and beautiful fall colors.  Come celebrate with the farmers!

In the next week I will be sending out a survey for you all to fill out.  Any information you could share about how the season went for you would be wonderful!  We are thinking strongly about offering a half-share next year and would love your input the overall interest in a half-share option. 
 
Thanks,

Aaron







   




 

 This and That

The butternut squash come to you from Vince at Intrinsik farm out here at Big River.  They are huge and should be great.  The butternut did not seem to fully mature as quickly as we would have liked.  We cooked up quite a few and the texture was good but they were not as sweet as the could be.  If you have the inclination, you should leave them to cure for another few weeks to a month; they will sweeten up.  Just moniter them for starting to spoil. 

We have brussel sprouts in the box this week!  I love these little gems of green.  If you grew up thinking brussel sprouts were disgusting please, I urge you, try them again.  These guys are the best.  My daughter starts asking me about a month before they are ready when can we start eating the brussels.  The recipe this week is a great way to cook them up.  Check it out.  We also just steam them in a pot and sprinkle them with UME Plum Vinegar.  This gives them a very rich complex taste.

Also this week we threw in the last of our tomatoes.  Only they are green tomatoes!  They just don't seem to want to ripen so... we thought we give some lovely green ones to make fried green tomatoes with.






































































 

 

 

©2012 Minnesota Food Association, 14220 B Ostlund Trail North, Marine on St. Croix, MN 55047 

651-433-3676 ph.  651 433-5050 fax
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Posted 10/1/2012 2:47pm by Minnesota Food Association.

Joe Hatch-Surisook, and his wife Holly and kids and crew, operate Sen Yai Sen Lek Restaurant in Northeast Minneapolis. Joe has now catered about 4 or 5 dinners out here on Big River Farms, and is buying fresh produce from farmers in our training program. We’ve gotten to know each other pretty well.  He and family were out here again on Sept 23 for our 3rd Annual Big River Slow Food Dinner. My family and I have eaten at Sen Yai Sen Lek many times and love it every time. If it was closer to Stillwater, we’d be there probably 2 – 3 times a week. (Hey, how about SYSL #2 in Stillwater?)

 After spending many years in Thailand, eating amazingly different and quality foods all over the country, my standards are pretty high for Thai food. Very few Thai restaurants in Minnesota serve authentic Thai food and they are hard to find.  Every time I ate at Sen Yai Sen Lek, I felt like it is really authentic but it’s different. It’s not some ‘fusion’ thing. It’s not ‘adapting Thai food to the American palate’ thing. But now it is clear to me. Joe believes in community and supporting local farmers. He believes in fresh local produce, and that fresh produce has better taste and higher nutritional value, than the frozen real thing sent over from Southeast Asia.  So what Joe is doing is very revolutionary. He is maintaining the original Thai styles of cooking, the authentic Thai balance of flavors (heat, sweet, salt, sour, bitter), but he is using as much local produce from local farmers as he can. He uses cucumbers or long beans or carrots to make Som Tam, instead of imported papaya, but then uses the same other ingredients and flavors that makes it ‘Som Tom’. He makes Tod Mun or Pla Duk Fu with walleye instead of the special fish, imported frozen from Thailand.  And now by working with local Karen-American and Hmong-American farmers, he is starting to get a variety of lemon grass, basil, eggplant, and other herbs and vegetables special to Southeast Asia but now grown fresh right here.

 It is very special in many ways. Contemporary cooking, and maintaining traditional flavors and food. Building community and partnering with other local businesses as a socially responsible business and member of the community. Check it out some time and ask for the special of that day because you know that at least during the growing season, it is fresh local produce.  

  

Glen

 

Glen Hill

Executive Director

Minnesota Food Association

Email: glenhill@mnfoodassociation.org

 

October 1, 2012

Posted 9/27/2012 4:38pm by Minnesota Food Association.

At MFA we appreciate people who appreciate food. Our 3rd annual Big River Slow Food Dinner on September 23 again showed a clear aspect of this. We had a stellar group of chefs and teams that love the art of cooking food:  Lucia Watson of Lucia’s; Nick Rancone and Thomas Boemer of Corner Table; Joe Hatch-Surisook of Sen Yai Sen Lek; and John Kraus of Patisserie 46. All were great.

 I grew up reading all outdoor magazines that I could get a hold of. Fishing is my passion. One day around 1990, I found In-Fisherman Magazine. After reading Outdoor Life, Field & Stream, etc. for 15 years, I found that they repeat the same articles in another format about every 3 years. In-Fisherman was different, it was more technical and they were constantly searching for new techniques and new things to learn about fishing. Lucia Watson was part of this. She wrote a new recipe each month for cooking walleye (usually, but sometimes catfish or panfish). I devoured the 2-page spread every month; a beautiful full-page picture and a short story with an elegant, clever and simple new recipe on the other. I would catch a fish to cook every day I could, but usually I just fried them.  And now I discovered a person who really appreciates cooking freshwater fish! I was thrilled. On long lonely days in remote places, seriously, I would read In-Fisherman over and over. I had not really ever been to MN. I did not know who Lucia was or Lucia’s Restaurant. But I felt like I knew Lucia.

 Fast-forward about 15 or 20 years, my family and I ended up living in MN and at an event one night about 3 years ago, I met Lucia.

I said, “ I know of a Lucia Watson, she writes for In-Fisherman Magazine”.

She said, “That’s me”

I was floored.

You know how you may follow a particular author or two for many years, and then you actually meet them? I followed Lucia’ recipes for 15 years. I tore them out and stored them in a folder.

 She was and is everything that I had pictured. Well-trained, skilled and experienced. Warm, welcoming and humble. Creative, imaginative and engaging. And she loves cooking with fresh water fish! And not just frying them.

After my initial stubbling in introducing myself, my first question was, ‘why do you usually only have recipes for walleye? Why not bass?” (because I catch and cook mostly bass)

 “Do you want  to eat a fish the roots around in the muck and lily pads or one that hangs in 35 feet of clear cold water?”

 I had never looked at it that way … and we talked for a half hour about different fish and different ways to cook fish. 

 Then last Sunday, wow, what a joy to have Lucia on our Farm for our Slow Food Dinner. I love it when the stars align. I love it even more when you recognize that the stars aligned.

 

Glen

 

Glen Hill

Executive Director

Minnesota Food Association

Email: glenhill@mnfoodassociation.org

 September 26, 2012

Posted 9/27/2012 3:06pm by Minnesota Food Association.

 

What’s in your box?
 
hierloom tomatoes
(Cala Farms)
red onion
yellow onion
carrots 
dill (Intrinsik Farm)
napa cabbage (Intrinsik Farm)
yellow potatoes
black beans
leek


Next week get ready for:


broccoli
wintersquash
brussel sprouts
carrots


and more... 

Get creative with your CSA box…try out our recipes!








Things to remember

1. When you arrive to pick up your box, remember to check your name off of the appropriate roster. There will be one each for Summer's Best & Fruitshare members. If you are picking up both, you will need to check your name off of both lists.

2. Please bring a bag or other container to transfer your veggies into & follow the instructions for breaking down your box found in the CSA bin.  The waxed cardboard boxes will need to stay at your site so that we may pick them up the following week for reuse.

3. In the spirit of community, please do not open or go through other boxes. Boxes are packed identically each week and there is no need to look for a better one.  If you are concerned with the contents of your box, or something is missing, please let me know as soon as you can & I'll do my darndest to remedy the situation.

4. Planning a vacation this summer? You've got some options. Invite a friend or neighbor to pick up in your stead while you're away. OR, you can contactme at least 24 hours in advance to donate your box to Minneapolis Market (a foodshelf with dignity).  All donations are tax deductible.  We are unable to prorate or credit you for canceled or forgotten boxes.

 

Upcoming Events

October 13th -
Fall Harvest Party!

 

Notes from the Field  

Hey Folks,

Wow!  This week has been a bit busy for me.  Not because of the farming per se, this time of year starts to slow down considerably.  The busy part for me has to do with the other hat I wear here.  Being a non-profit and a training farm means we seem to always have something else to do on the horizon.

This week I was able to participate in a wonderful conference here in Minneapolis called the Food + Justice = Democracy Conference.  I was able to spend two days listening to activists, farmers, and community organizers speak on their visions and ideas around what a Just Food system might look like. 

I came a way with many wonderful ideas and understandings about how we here at Big River Farms fit into a braoder context of trying to change the food system.     

All of you, as CSA members, see the friut of many of the farm's and farmer's labor over the season.  The red peppers, kale, tomatoes, watermelon, and every other vegetable is an  amazing part of the success many of the folks in our program have. 

This week's conference got me to see again with fresh eyes another aspect of what your support for our CSA allows many of the farmers in our program to do; bring incredible produce back to their homes and communities.  Many farmers here come from communities with very little access to fresh produce and healthy foods.  Not only fresh produce but also the type of produce they are used to eating.

However, many farmers here are consistantly bringing home amazing amounts of produce.  The Karen farmers bring home Roselle and pumpkin leaves to their comunnities.  Vince, a Hmong farmer, brings home long beans and sticky corn. 

Thanks to your support local immigrant and historically underserved farmers are getting a great price for their produce.  This, in and of itself, is fantastic.  But just as importantly  your support helps get great produce in the homes and stomachs of many deserving folks who may not have the option of buying the same quality of produce from a store.

Thanks,

Aaron







   




 

 This and That

Are those black beans in this week's box!  Absolutely!
The black beans come from Porfirio of Sebra Farm.  He grew about a 1/4 acre of beans here this year and had an absolutely astounding harvest.  He was able to get about 1500 lbs of beans from his field. 

We are very excited to offer these beans to you.  I have always wanted to try doing more dry beans but have always been intimidated by the amount of work and the low cost of selling black beans.  Porfirio will not make a ton of money off of his beans but he says he is extremely excited by not having to buy beans for the next year or two.

 

 

 

©2012 Minnesota Food Association, 14220 B Ostlund Trail North, Marine on St. Croix, MN 55047 

651-433-3676 ph.  651 433-5050 fax
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Posted 9/26/2012 4:32pm by Minnesota Food Association.

So … now for the rest of the story. What are the other four food experiences in my top 5? In brief and not  by priority:

 

  1. Sitting on a beach side bungalow restaurant in Thailand, eating plain boiled crabs, ordered directly from the chef the day before, with a couple of different spicy dipping sauces. Slowly picking apart the crabs, piece by piece, for an hour and half with a completely messy face and hands, with a warm sea breeze, watching the setting sun over the ocean.
  2. Le Plantuer Restaurant Saturday Barbeque Special in Rangoon. All you can eat grilled fish, shellfish, mollusks, squid, prawns, steak, pork ribs, chicken and different salads and side dishes. Set in an outdoor garden, decorated with colorful Burmese umbrellas highlighted by subtle backlights. Included in the $18 price is all you can drink beer, red or white wine and Johhny Walker Red. We had many long great dinners there with dear friends.
  3. Tom Yam Soup at the KT Guest House in Bangkok. There are many, many amazing places to eat in Thailand and you just can’t know or list them all. But at the very hidden-away KT Guest House in Northeast Bangkok, their senior staff and head cook, Somai, made the best Tom Yam Soup, with shrimp, that I ever had. And everyone I ever took there, said it is the best they ever had. She used all fresh ingredients, no cubes or flavoring, with the best combination of heat, sour, sweet and salt.  We would plan our many day-trips in Bangkok so that we could swing by and get lunch or dinner.
  4. My first authentic, village-style, home cooked Karen dinner. My first introduction to the Karen people of Burma, we crossed the border in the back of beat up pick-up truck. Rumbled another  20 miles, about 2 hours, deeper into the jungle, down and down hill, until we reached the Tennasserim River. There was a large village where my friend, Frankie, lived. Hungry, tired, anxious, very excited, sitting in the dark with lanterns and candles, on a wooden floor in a house on stilts, we were presented with a dazzling array of Karen dishes – curries, soups, fried fish, fresh vegetables, cook vegetables, 6 or 8 different kinds of leaves and soft greens, a couple of chili pastes. All this was made under candlelight over small charcoal grills by my friend’s wife. The care she put into every thing overwhelmed us. The balance of flavors and the amount of cooking of not cooking and the quantity was so planful and yet normal.  As we ate and ate and talked and talked, you could see in her big smile that she was pleased.

 

When I woke up and recalled this, it occurred to me that this Big River Slow Food Dinner is the first and only one in my top 5 that’s in the USA. Tough competition to get into my top 5, and Sunday night did it. (Oops, I forgot that amazing welcome dinner from my Japanese mother-in-law on my first visit to their home… maybe I need a top 6?)

 

Glen

 

Glen Hill

Executive Director

Minnesota Food Association

Email: glenhill@mnfoodassociation.org

September 26, 2012

Posted 9/25/2012 8:47pm by Minnesota Food Association.

The Top Five Food Experiences Of My Life

 MFA and Slow Food MN held our 3rd annual Big River Slow Food Dinner yesterday. We had walking farm tours, sitting discussion groups, and a lively, charming Q&A discussion with three farmers from Kenya, Burma, and Laos. The chefs set up their large kitchen behind the barn and prepared pork, walleye, duck, loads of vegetables and delicious desserts. Later than night before falling asleep I thought this dinner may have broken into my top 5 food experiences.

 Have you ever thought about your top 5 food experiences? It is not easy to narrow the list but it’s fun to think about. A food experience is not necessarily just one meal and is not just about the food but includes the overall atmosphere, the setting, the people.

 We had a total of about 125 people when you include all the guests, chefs and their teams, staff, and volunteers. Beautiful table arrangements in the freshly cleaned out barn. Sunny, slightly breezy, cool in the shade and warm like a turtle on a log in the sun out of the breeze. The discussions and camaraderie between everyone was fantastic. There wasn’t enough time to talk to everyone you wanted to. The kitchen, with prep tables and large grills going, plumes of sizzling smoke rising in the late sun.  A walking duet playing music through out the event. Generous local venders passing out their artesian beverages. And of course the food was amazing. Gougeres, crostini, and grilled chicken hors d’oeuvres. Curried walleye cakes, Thai style with spicy long bean salad. Duck prosciutto. Red Wattle Chouroute pork braised, sausage and porketta with vegetables from our farmers. Red wine poached plums with tarragon ice cream. It truly was for me in my top 5 food experiences. Thank you everyone for coming. Thank you chefs and your great teams:  Lucia Watson of Lucia’s; Nick Rancone and Thomas Boemer of Corner Table; Joe Hatch-Surisook of Sen Yai Sen Lek; and John Kraus of Patisserie 46. 

 If you would like to know my other top four food experiences in my top 5, please read my next posting.

 Glen

 

Glen Hill

Executive Director

Minnesota Food Association

Email: glenhill@mnfoodassociation.org

 

September 24, 2012

Posted 9/18/2012 3:14pm by Minnesota Food Association.

 

What’s in your box?
 
hierloom tomatoes
(Cala Farms)
green onions
carrots (Chickenhead Farm)
dill (Intrinsik Farm)
beets (Intrinsik Farm)
spinach
kale
acorn squash (Sebra Farm)
daikon (First Karen Farm)


Next week get ready for:


leeks
wintersquash
hierloom toms
potatoes

and more... 

Get creative with your CSA box…try out our recipes!



Marinated daikon radish

Roasted Winter Vegetables

Borscht

Things to remember

1. When you arrive to pick up your box, remember to check your name off of the appropriate roster. There will be one each for Summer's Best & Fruitshare members. If you are picking up both, you will need to check your name off of both lists.

2. Please bring a bag or other container to transfer your veggies into & follow the instructions for breaking down your box found in the CSA bin.  The waxed cardboard boxes will need to stay at your site so that we may pick them up the following week for reuse.

3. In the spirit of community, please do not open or go through other boxes. Boxes are packed identically each week and there is no need to look for a better one.  If you are concerned with the contents of your box, or something is missing, please let me know as soon as you can & I'll do my darndest to remedy the situation.

4. Planning a vacation this summer? You've got some options. Invite a friend or neighbor to pick up in your stead while you're away. OR, you can contactme at least 24 hours in advance to donate your box to Minneapolis Market (a foodshelf with dignity).  All donations are tax deductible.  We are unable to prorate or credit you for canceled or forgotten boxes.

 

Upcoming Events

August 19th—Dinner on the Farm

September 23rd—Slow Food MN presents a Slow Food meal at Big River Farms!

 

Notes from the Field  

Hey Folks,

My daughter and I were talking this last weekend about a old Disney book she likes to read.  In it, Donald Duck has three nephews who go into the world and each bring back a magic item that allows them one thing. One nephew brings home a magic stick that can beat off anyone trying to harm you.  One nephew brings home a donkey that gives any amount of gold coins you could ask for.  And the third nephew brings home an old table that will always be full of delicious food. 

We were asking ourselves which of these three items would we want if we could only have one of them.  Addie went straight for the donkey and the money (it is probably the best bet really).  And most likely, to be perfectly honest, given those choices it does seem like the money would be nice and useful and the obvious choice. 

It got me thinking about farming and growing food.  Farming is by no means a gold coin giving donkey that gaurentees a life of ease and riches.  It is by no means a stick that will protect you from the harshness of the world and the craziness of the weather.  It is however, in its way, for the farmers, a magic table with always plenty of food on it.  

I have been on a lot of vegetable farms in my adult life.  I have seen ones that grow an absolute abundance of amazing vegetables and I have seen ones that limp sadly along pulling funky little things out of weedy fields.  However, they all seemed to have one thing in common; the farmers all ate like kings and queens.  

In this profession, even when the season is rough and the sales are low, you still most of the time get to come home to a magic table of abundant food.  Even when we are just eating all the peppers with rot spots, or the half of cabbage that didn't get infested with cabbage worm poop, or all the potatoes that got forked in the digging process; by the time the table is set and dinner begins our magic table is briming with glory!

I hope you all enjoy the veggies!

Aaron







   




 

 This and That

We are heading into the boxes having a little more fall in them!  I am completely overjoyed with having some fresh spinach again.  This has been an overall great year for vegetables but I have been missing spinach and lettuce.   So this week we get a taste of some lovely spinach.  The heat and dryness of the summer did not treat our greens well.  The first thing my family thinks of when there is fresh spinach is the Gado Gado recipe I gave out earlier this year.  We made it on Saturday night.  Yum!

If you have any beets left over from a couple of weeks ago and can use the ones in the box I highly recommend this borscht recipe.  It is the best!

One new vegetable this week is the small acorn squash. This winter squash, with its nutty-yet-sweet flavor, will keep in cool, dark, dry, and well-ventilated storage space for several months. It is a early-ripening squash, however, so it will not last all winter long.

I have to put in a special plug for the roasted winter vegetable recipe this week. I love this recipe, it is so versatile and PERFECT for those CSA vegetables you just don't know what to do with. Simply turn on the oven, chop up 6 to 8 cups of whatever winter vegetables you have on-hand (like winter squash, carrots, beets, red and yellow onions and potatoes), toss with olive oil and salt, and roast in the oven until tender. It's so easy and always satisfying; serve it up with a side of rice or over a fresh spinach salad. 

 

Daikon RadishYou might be wondering, "What in the world is that white carrot-like vegetable in my box?"  Well, I am pleased to introduce you to the versatile daikon radish (pictured right), a vegetable commonly eaten and grown in Asia. The easiest way to eat this mildly-spicy radish is to incorporate it into your next stir fry (add with a mix of chopped veggies and season generously with soy sauce, fish sauce, and/or sriracha sauce).  If you are a pickle-lover, check out the Marinated Daikon Radish recipe.  Or, if you still have leftover Napa cabbage, you can use your daikon to make last week's Kimchi.

 

 

 

©2012 Minnesota Food Association, 14220 B Ostlund Trail North, Marine on St. Croix, MN 55047 

651-433-3676 ph.  651 433-5050 fax
Unsubscribe from this email list.
Privacy Policy.

Did you receive this newsletter from a friend? Subscribe MnFoodAssociation.org

 

 

Posted 9/4/2012 3:24pm by Minnesota Food Association.

 

What’s in your box?

grape tomatoes (Sebra Farm
red tomatoes  (Sebra Farm)

hierloom tomatoes
(Cala Farms)
green onion
yellow onion
garlic
yellow potatoes
beets
red peppers
green beans (Intrinsik Farm)
green pepper (Sebra Farm)
cilantro (Intrinsik Farm)
cucumber (Chickenhead Farm)

Next week get ready for:


leeks
savoy cabbage
hierloom toms
carrots 


and more... 

Get creative with your CSA box…try out our recipes!

Secret Chocolate Cake

Peperonata

Golden Corncakes

Things to remember

1. When you arrive to pick up your box, remember to check your name off of the appropriate roster. There will be one each for Summer's Best & Fruitshare members. If you are picking up both, you will need to check your name off of both lists.

2. Please bring a bag or other container to transfer your veggies into & follow the instructions for breaking down your box found in the CSA bin.  The waxed cardboard boxes will need to stay at your site so that we may pick them up the following week for reuse.

3. In the spirit of community, please do not open or go through other boxes. Boxes are packed identically each week and there is no need to look for a better one.  If you are concerned with the contents of your box, or something is missing, please let me know as soon as you can & I'll do my darndest to remedy the situation.

4. Planning a vacation this summer? You've got some options. Invite a friend or neighbor to pick up in your stead while you're away. OR, you can contactme at least 24 hours in advance to donate your box to Minneapolis Market (a foodshelf with dignity).  All donations are tax deductible.  We are unable to prorate or credit you for canceled or forgotten boxes.

 

Upcoming Events

August 19th—Dinner on the Farm

September 23rd—Slow Food MN presents a Slow Food meal at Big River Farms!

 

Notes from the Field  

Hey Folks,

I am running a bit late today on the newsletter.  It is already late and we still want to do some weeding today.  So I am skipping my little rambling farmer's ditty this week.  Sorry...perhaps instead of waxing poetic about farming today I will just admit that part of any farm is always running a bit behind schedule...


Enjoy the veggies...


Aaron


 

This N That

This week we are a little short on any greens.  The dryness and heat as of late is really not the best for lettuce and greens.  We have once again lost a crop of lettuce (this time Romaine) to bolting and going to seed.  We ussually grow beautiful lettuce starting this time of year but we have lost 3 successions in the last few weeks.  We have a few more possibilities of lettuce coming but we will have to wait and see.  This is certainly a reason to relook at our variety selections and growing techniques for lettuce.

On the flipside we are still getting beautiful red peppers and heirloom tomatoes!  If you are looking for a unique way to save these red peppers try the Peperonatarecipe. 

Peperonata is as simple and delicious as it comes: ribbons of pepper preserved in oil and vinegar, to eat then and there or bottle and store for later. The vinegar preserves the peppers and the sugar softens the flavor. This takes a lot of peppers for just one jar, so this recipe is one for when they’re cheap in a market or you have more than you can eat from the garden. Peperonata is lovely eaten with hot or cold meat and excellent with cheese.

 I hope you all enjoy the return of green onions to the box this week.  These delicate little bugers are delicious.

For those of you who love beets I am assuming that you have no need for a recipe on how to use these perfect summer gems.  However, if you or someone in your family suffers from beet weariness please try this delicious  secret chocolate cake recipe that uses beets.  Hint: do not tell folks it is made from beets until after they try it.  That way they will be sure to love it!
  
Happy eating!

Aaron

 

 

 

©2012 Minnesota Food Association, 14220 B Ostlund Trail North, Marine on St. Croix, MN 55047 

651-433-3676 ph.  651 433-5050 fax
Unsubscribe from this email list.
Privacy Policy.

Did you receive this newsletter from a friend? Subscribe MnFoodAssociation.org

 

 

Posted 8/23/2012 11:32am by Minnesota Food Association.

 

What’s in your box?

cherry tomatoes
red tomatoes  (Sebra Farm)

hierloom tomatoes Some Sites Only! (Cala Farms)
red onion
yellow onion
watermelon
carrots
red pepper
Hmong cucumbers (Intrinsik Farm)
green beans (Intrinsik Farm)
hmong long beans (Intrinsik Farm)
HOT! thai hot peppers HOT! (Intrinsik Farm)
green pepper (Sebra Farm)
sweet corn (Sebra Farm)
cilantro (Sebra Farm)
jalepeno (Sebra Farm)



Next week get ready for:


cherry tomatoes
hierloom tomatoes
green beans

and more... 

Get creative with your CSA box…try out our recipes!

Papaya Salad made with Cucumbers

Mel's Jalepeno Cornbread

Green Bean Salad

Things to remember

1. When you arrive to pick up your box, remember to check your name off of the appropriate roster. There will be one each for Summer's Best & Fruitshare members. If you are picking up both, you will need to check your name off of both lists.

2. Please bring a bag or other container to transfer your veggies into & follow the instructions for breaking down your box found in the CSA bin.  The waxed cardboard boxes will need to stay at your site so that we may pick them up the following week for reuse.

3. In the spirit of community, please do not open or go through other boxes. Boxes are packed identically each week and there is no need to look for a better one.  If you are concerned with the contents of your box, or something is missing, please let me know as soon as you can & I'll do my darndest to remedy the situation.

4. Planning a vacation this summer? You've got some options. Invite a friend or neighbor to pick up in your stead while you're away. OR, you can contactme at least 24 hours in advance to donate your box to Minneapolis Market (a foodshelf with dignity).  All donations are tax deductible.  We are unable to prorate or credit you for canceled or forgotten boxes.

 

Upcoming Events

August 19th—Dinner on the Farm

September 23rd—Slow Food MN presents a Slow Food meal at Big River Farms!

 

Notes from the Field  

Hey Folks,

This is the time of year when we are still harvesting in full swing but we are also starting to slowly think about next year and putting the farm to bed for the winter.  Mid-August is the time for seeding our first round of winter covercrops.  Around August 15th I always try and have all of our early season vegetable ground turned over and planted to a oat and pea mixture.  The oat and peas do a great job of covering the ground, providing lots of organic matter to the soil, and adding good old nitrogen to the field.  The best part is that they die over our cold winter and in the spring we have a clean gound to plant our early crops into.  

Last week I stayed on the tractor late into the night to methodically seed all of the ground we had open.  Seeding covercrop borders on religous ritual for me.  I got off the tractor at 9:30 pm and checked the weather radar one last time.  It said a beautiful storm was heading our way.  Yes!  Sweet farming!  A good day of long hours, getting everything done on the list, and all of it just in time for the rain to come and get it all sprouted.  Farming is the best! Wow! I am a good farmer.  Time to go to bed with peace and contentment.  

Well...the rain did not come and I am now on our fifth day in a row of trying to get all our covercrop ground irrigated.  Nothing is ever quite gaurenteed in this world is it?  Well I suppose life would be boring if it all were easy... 

Thanks,


Aaron


 

This N That





This week we are mixing it up a little bit with a recipe direct from the kitchen table of one of the farmers in our program.  Vince Xiong, owner of Intrinsik Farm, wanted to share a favorite recipe of his family.  We have been waiting for all of the ingredients to become ripe.  The recipe is a papaya salad that the Hmong of Minnesota have adapted to use their bigger (maybe a little over ripe) cucmbers.  So the little red hot peppers in the bag are thai peppers (THEY ARE HOT!), the cucumbers are bigger than most of us are used to, and the other ingredients may not be something you have in your house.  However, I encourage you to try out this recipe.  It is absolutely delicious and my wife and I used it as a learning experience for our 5 year old daughter.  Also the beautiful Hmong long beans that we have in the box can be used just like regular green beans only they should be cooked a bit longer to get the same desired tenderness.  Vince said in his house they keep the long beans next to the salad, so that when their mouths get too hot from the peppers the beans have a cooling effect.

The beautiful colored peppers are going to keep coming, so if they are starting to build up in your fridge, then it might be time to start freezing them for the winter months and they are one of the easiest vegetables to freeze.  Prepare the pepper as you would to use fresh, chopping to a size you like, put them in a freezer bag and stick them in the freezer.  Flattening the peppers out in the bag makes it easier to break off and use smaller amounts when you are ready to use them.  Sauté as you would fresh peppers.



As always, if you come up with something good please share it with us!  You can send me your recips at brfcsa@mnfoodassociation.org

Happy eating!

Aaron

 

 

 

©2012 Minnesota Food Association, 14220 B Ostlund Trail North, Marine on St. Croix, MN 55047 

651-433-3676 ph.  651 433-5050 fax
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Posted 8/21/2012 3:24pm by Minnesota Food Association.

 

What’s in your box?

cherry tomatoes
red tomatoes  (Sebra Farm)

hierloom tomatoes (Cala Farms)
red onion
yellow onion
watermelon
carrots
red pepper
cucumbers (Intrinsik Farm)
green beans (Intrinsik Farm)
hmong long beans (Intrinsik Farm)
HOT! thai hot peppers HOT! (Intrinsik Farm)
green pepper (Sebra Farm)
sweet corn (Sebra Farm)
cilantro (Sebra Farm)
jalepeno (Sebra Farm)



Next week get ready for:


cherry tomatoes
hierloom tomatoes
green beans

and more... 

Get creative with your CSA box…try out our recipes!

Papaya Salad made with Cucumbers

Mel's Jalepeno Cornbread

Green Bean Salad

Things to remember

1. When you arrive to pick up your box, remember to check your name off of the appropriate roster. There will be one each for Summer's Best & Fruitshare members. If you are picking up both, you will need to check your name off of both lists.

2. Please bring a bag or other container to transfer your veggies into & follow the instructions for breaking down your box found in the CSA bin.  The waxed cardboard boxes will need to stay at your site so that we may pick them up the following week for reuse.

3. In the spirit of community, please do not open or go through other boxes. Boxes are packed identically each week and there is no need to look for a better one.  If you are concerned with the contents of your box, or something is missing, please let me know as soon as you can & I'll do my darndest to remedy the situation.

4. Planning a vacation this summer? You've got some options. Invite a friend or neighbor to pick up in your stead while you're away. OR, you can contactme at least 24 hours in advance to donate your box to Minneapolis Market (a foodshelf with dignity).  All donations are tax deductible.  We are unable to prorate or credit you for canceled or forgotten boxes.

 

Upcoming Events

August 19th—Dinner on the Farm

September 23rd—Slow Food MN presents a Slow Food meal at Big River Farms!

 

Notes from the Field  

Hey Folks,

This is the time of year when we are still harvesting in full swing but we are also starting to slowly think about next year and putting the farm to bed for the winter.  Mid-August is the time for seeding our first round of winter covercrops.  Around August 15th I always try and have all of our early season vegetable ground turned over and planted to a oat and pea mixture.  The oat and peas do a great job of covering the ground, providing lots of organic matter to the soil, and adding good old nitrogen to the field.  The best part is that they die over our cold winter and in the spring we have a clean gound to plant our early crops into.  

Last week I stayed on the tractor late into the night to methodically seed all of the ground we had open.  Seeding covercrop borders on religous ritual for me.  I got off the tractor at 9:30 pm and checked the weather radar one last time.  It said a beautiful storm was heading our way.  Yes!  Sweet farming!  A good day of long hours, getting everything done on the list, and all of it just in time for the rain to come and get it all sprouted.  Farming is the best! Wow! I am a good farmer.  Time to go to bed with peace and contentment.  

Well...the rain did not come and I am now on our fifth day in a row of trying to get all our covercrop ground irrigated.  Nothing is ever quite gaurenteed in this world is it?  Well I suppose life would be boring if it all were easy... 

Thanks,


Aaron


 

This N That





This week we are mixing it up a little bit with a recipe direct from the kitchen table of one of the farmers in our program.  Vince Xiong, owner of Intrinsik Farm, wanted to share a favorite recipe of his family.  We have been waiting for all of the ingredients to become ripe.  The recipe is a papaya salad that the Hmong of Minnesota have adapted to use their bigger (maybe a little over ripe) cucmbers.  So the little red hot peppers in the bag are thai peppers (THEY ARE HOT!), the cucumbers are bigger than most of us are used to, and the other ingredients may not be something you have in your house.  However, I encourage you to try out this recipe.  It is absolutely delicious and my wife and I used it as a learning experience for our 5 year old daughter.  Also the beautiful Hmong long beans that we have in the box can be used just like regular green beans only they should be cooked a bit longer to get the same desired tenderness.  Vince said in his house they keep the long beans next to the salad, so that when their mouths get too hot from the peppers the beans have a cooling effect.

The beautiful colored peppers are going to keep coming, so if they are starting to build up in your fridge, then it might be time to start freezing them for the winter months and they are one of the easiest vegetables to freeze.  Prepare the pepper as you would to use fresh, chopping to a size you like, put them in a freezer bag and stick them in the freezer.  Flattening the peppers out in the bag makes it easier to break off and use smaller amounts when you are ready to use them.  Sauté as you would fresh peppers.



As always, if you come up with something good please share it with us!  You can send me your recips at brfcsa@mnfoodassociation.org

Happy eating!

Aaron

 

 

 

©2012 Minnesota Food Association, 14220 B Ostlund Trail North, Marine on St. Croix, MN 55047 

651-433-3676 ph.  651 433-5050 fax
Unsubscribe from this email list.
Privacy Policy.

Did you receive this newsletter from a friend? Subscribe MnFoodAssociation.org